Tag Archives: Theatre

Never Still At The Firehall Arts Centre September 26th – 29th, 2018

12 Sep

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Never Still the newest work by Vanessa Goodman is inspired by the inherent conflicts and dichotomies of water. The production is both graceful and challenging, much like humanity itself. The show has social, environmental and biological themes explored within this highly physical new work.  Never Still dives into the distinctive and overlap between three different systems of circulation: global water cycles, communication technology and fluids within the body.  “We are living in an increasingly polarized culture,” says Donna Spencer, the Firehall Arts Centre’s Artistic Producer. “And it is our role as artistic creators to encourage audiences to consider, through what they are seeing on stage, how inextricably linked we all are in finding our way through these challenging times.”  Donna goes onto say that this Season the Firehall Arts Centre’s programming is “about choices – ones we make, the one we think we should make but don’t and the influences around us that colour that decision-making”. This production is a collaboration Shion Skye Carter, Stéphanie Cyr, Bynh Ho, Scott Morgan, Alexa Mardon, James Proudfoot and Lexi Vajda.   Never Still is at the Firehall Arts Centre from Wednesday, September 26th to Saturday, September 29th at 8:00 pm. Tickets are $20 and available online at Firehall Arts Centre.

Photo Credit: Ben Didier

Rumble Theatre Presents Tremors 2018 At The Italian Cultural Centre August 16-25, 2018

15 Aug

Tremors2018In 2007, Rumble Theatre created the Tremors Festival which was originally a two week run of plays created by emerging companies. In 2014, they devised a new model for this festival which focused on providing mentorship to individual emerging artists rather than emerging companies. Tremors is now a vehicle for young emerging artists to build networks, receive professional mentorship, develop their craft and work on exciting plays. Each show is directed, designed, stage managed, and performed by a company of emerging artists working with the guidance of professional mentors. This year, they have are producing 3 contemporary Canadian plays:  Selfie by Christine Quintana, Tiny Replicas by Dave Deveau, and Theory by Norman Yeung.

From August 16 to 25, these three plays and their Tremors lounge will be created in different rooms of the Italian Cultural Centre, 3075 Slocan Street. You are invited to stop by and see one show, see a double bill, or take in all three. Admission to all shows is Pay-What-You-Decide.  You, the audience members, get to pick what to see and how much to pay. For more information or to purchase advance tickets, visit Tremors 2018.

This There Continues At The Cultch July 25-28, 2018

16 Jul

ThisHereWhat does it mean to live?  Big question right?  Everyone’s definition will be different. This There asks the big question in this production coming to The Cultch.  Follow Alison and Maddie who are at a crossroads in life.  Alison is a disenchanted actress and isn’t sure she wishes to continue in her chosen profession.  Maddie on the other hand is an entrepreneur who is the verge of selling her catering business she’s worked hard to build up over many years.  The couple take a trip to the West Coast for a quiet vacation and change of scenery and to visit Alison’s father. All with demanding careers in their own right, the trip brings things into focus for them all.  This There continues at The Cultch July 25-28.  Tickets are $30 with $20 tickets available for artist, low income and students.

Eat.Drink.Play. At The Firehall Arts Centre June 14, 2018

6 Jun

EatDrinkPlay2018The Firehall Arts Centre invites you to Eat.Drink.Play. being held on Thursday, June 14th from 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm at the Firehall Arts Centre, 280 East Cordova Street.  This annual fundraiser brings together some of East Van’s best restaurants, craft brewers, small-batch distillers and performers for an evening of sampling and sharing.  The event takes over the Firehall’s entire premises including theatre, lobby, studio, courtyard as well as the dressing rooms.  Throughout the Firehall, you will find an array of delectable treats, eclectic dance, music and performances as well as a silent auction.  Eat.Drink.Play will feature selections of food from neighbourhood hot spots including The Pint, Tuc Craft Kitchen, Cadeaux Baker, Crab Park Chowdery, Kofta, Elephant & Castle.  Libations will be provided the kind folks at Steamworks Brewery nand Odd Society Spirits as well as Hoochy Boooch kombucha.  You can expect a smorgasbord of delectable treats and enjoyable performances as you roam through the heritage building sampling food, enjoying libations, and bidding on some amazing silent auction items. For music and laughter, Krystle Dos Santos, recently seen in the Chelsea Hotel will be on hand as will Andy Toth seen in the Firehall’s Urinetown The Musical and a few more guests. The Firehall Arts Centre has been producing performing arts for 35 years in this beautiful heritage building at the corner of Cordova and Gore. We invite you to lend your support for our City’s vibrant and innovative arts community. Tickets for Eat.Drink.Play are $49 and $25 for artists and are available online at Firehall Arts Centre.

Contributing Writer Tiva Quinn Checks Out rEvolver Festival On Until June 3rd

1 Jun

RevolverFestivalContributing writer, Tiva Quinn, checked out a few shows being featured as part of the rEvolver Festival. This festival featuring young contemporary artists is on now at The Cultch until June 3rd.  Get out and see for yourself what’s on. Visit The Cultch for tickets.

BUG 

Bug clearly shows that young Ojibwe artist Yolanda Bonnell is a performer and creator to watch. In this one-woman show about addictions, intergenerational trauma and the foster care system, Yolanda portrays a young woman growing up too fast and accepting abusive relationships into her life as a sign that she matters to someone. She also portrays the young woman’s mother, wrestling with her addictions and with questions about whether or not she deserved to have her child taken away by the government. And in a strange and powerful way, she also gives voice to the power of addiction and intergenerational trauma itself, manifesting as Manidoons – the Ojibwe word for bug or worm. The two human characters, mother and daughter, become stunningly real and complex in a short period of time – while the Manidoons are represented as a simple, genuinely creepy being who cares only about gaining more and more control over human lives.

PROBABILITY

Next I went to Probability, a show about two women who may or may not end up in love, and may or may not succeed in making a go of it if they do. Probability managed to be laugh out loud funny in  several places, while also digging into some pretty deep material about the things we want and the things we fear in intimate relationships. The improv game technique of having two actors represent the characters in the story while another two represent their inner monologues is used to excellent effect here – a lot of the ProbabilityPosterfunniest moments and also the most painful, heart-tugging moments come from the difference between what the characters say and what’s going on in their minds. It also means that we get to see the process in motion both when they try to protect themselves and when they try to reveal themselves. All four actresses do a terrific job here, and the set deserves honorable mention as well.

KITT & JANE

Last, I saw Kitt & Jane: An Interactive Survival Guide to the Near-Post-Apocalyptic Future which was also a mix of comedy and serious themes, but with a lot more emphasis on the comedy. Kitt and Jane depicts the antics of two 8th graders who take over their school assembly and decide to present about the coming eco-apocalypse instead of their assigned topic, the life cycle of the salmon. Like actual 8th graders, the actors are incredibly funny at several points along the way, but they also take their  obsessions a bit too far and wear on our nerves at times. The show’s creators cite Adventure Time, Big Mouth, and Gravity Falls as some of their influences and the show definitely is a lot like watching human cartoons. If you enjoy the humor in characters who never quite realize when they’ve gone too far, you might just love this show.

Photo Credit: Patricia Trinh

 

Nicole Alivojvodic Reviews 12 Minute Madness – rEvolver Festival

28 May

12MinuteMadnessChrisRandleThis year’s rEvolver Festival is focusing on women creators as all the mainstage shows have either been created or co-created by women. One of these shows, 12 Minute Madness, features an entirely female cast. Incredibly dark and candid, the show’s 12 performers give the audience a twisted look into the mind of a sexual abuse survivor. Earning a standing ovation on opening night, this tale is as raunchy as it is poignant – a piece that has necessarily been born out of the #MeToo movement.

The story follows a young woman, Marlena, as she recalls repressed memories of the sexual abuse she suffered as a child at the hands of her own grandfather. Instead of representing different players in this story in the outside world, each character in the production embodies a different part of Marlena’s psyche as she grapples with what has happened to her and questions the reliability of her own memories. There’s shame, there’s sadness, there’s anger and there’s reason (to name a few) and all contribute to complete madness inside Marlena’s head.

This production offers a glance into the mind and soul of a victim of sexual abuse and calls for audiences to realize the multi-faceted and contradictory thoughts and feelings that occur in the mind alone, before even reaching the world outside. rEvolver Festival continues at The Cultch until June 3rd.

By Contributing Writer: Nicole Alivojvodic

Photo Credit: Chris Randle

 

Nicole Alivojvodic Reviews The Only Good Indian – rEvolver Festival

24 May

OneGoodIndianPhotoGrahamIsadorPandemic Theatre’s The Only Good Indian, presented by Upintheair Theatre, is on now at the Cultch for the 2018 rEvolver Festival. Performed by several different artists throughout the run of the festival, this piece is part lecture, part meditation and part threat. In it’s West Coast premiere, Toronto’s Jivesh Parasram delivers a funny, yet disturbing and thought provoking account of his experience as an “other” in a world of purported shared human experience.

Each night of The Only Good Indian, a different performer straps themselves into a suicide vest and attempts to rationalize such an “irrational” decision. In doing so, the performer forces the audience to think about, look at, and listen to things that are uncomfortable – visiting dark corners of the human mind which are cast aside in polite conversation.

The aim of the project is to explore the idea of “pluriversality” – the belief that there are many world views and many cosmologies which comprise the whole. This concept is in direct contravention of the idea of a “common truth”, a claim that suggests there is a correct way to think, speak and act, which is so prevalent in the western world and even right here in our community. The Only Good Indian is an experiment which forces people to question their own prejudices and privileges, however “woke” they think they might be.

For tickets to this production, as part of the 2018 rEvolver Festival, visit The Cultch.

By Contributing Writer Nicole Alivojvodic

Photo Credit: Graham Isador

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